MyFavHistoryPics
Windswept by Jungle_Boy on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
Hadrian’s Wall (built AD 122) is the most famous Roman site in Britain.

Windswept by Jungle_Boy on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
Hadrian’s Wall (built AD 122) is the most famous Roman site in Britain.

Abbey Ruins ( Shropshire,UK) by DonCarlosRutter29 on Flickr.
York England - St Mary’s Abbey - ruins of Benedictine  Gothic church built 1271-94 by edk7 on Flickr.
York England - St Mary’s Abbey - ruins of Benedictine Gothic church built 1271-94  by edk7 on Flickr.
London Bloomsbury - British Museum - Sphinx of Taharqo - Kushite Egyptian pharaoh - head of granite sculpture c680BC - Temple ‘T’, Kawa, Sudan by edk7 on Flickr.
Salisbury Wiltshire England - Old Sarum - ruins of Norman medieval castle and motte built 1100–35 by edk7 on Flickr.
NC294 British Museum - Parthenon Sculptures, The Feast by HairyHippy on Flickr.Via Flickr:British Museum - Elgin Marbles, The Feast
The Parthenon Sculptures were created for the metopes high above the ground, to decorate the temple to Athena in Athens. The work was completed around 440 BC. The sculptures represented a procession, scenes from the then current mythology, and a feast.
Seeing how the Parthenon suffered damage over the centuries, Lord Elgin undertook the task of rescuing the remaining decorative carving at his own expense. In 1801 he removed as much as he could and by 1812 had removed around half of the original carvings. Some had been ground down and smashed for earlier building materials, and others suffered irreparable weather damage.
Elgin was almost bankrupt when the stones arrived in England, but the British government stepped in to purchase them from him, then presented them to the British Museum.
Even in those days there was controversy about removing the sculptures from Greece. The British not only said then but also still maintain that the works would suffer damage if returned to Athens. The Greeks say that their conservators are the best in the world. They also claim that the 19th century British restorers actually degraded the stones.
The debate will rumble on, with politicians posturing as it suits their cause. Meanwhile, we are able to enjoy the marbles, now at eye level.

NC294 British Museum - Parthenon Sculptures, The Feast by HairyHippy on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
British Museum - Elgin Marbles, The Feast

The Parthenon Sculptures were created for the metopes high above the ground, to decorate the temple to Athena in Athens. The work was completed around 440 BC. The sculptures represented a procession, scenes from the then current mythology, and a feast.

Seeing how the Parthenon suffered damage over the centuries, Lord Elgin undertook the task of rescuing the remaining decorative carving at his own expense. In 1801 he removed as much as he could and by 1812 had removed around half of the original carvings. Some had been ground down and smashed for earlier building materials, and others suffered irreparable weather damage.

Elgin was almost bankrupt when the stones arrived in England, but the British government stepped in to purchase them from him, then presented them to the British Museum.

Even in those days there was controversy about removing the sculptures from Greece. The British not only said then but also still maintain that the works would suffer damage if returned to Athens. The Greeks say that their conservators are the best in the world. They also claim that the 19th century British restorers actually degraded the stones.

The debate will rumble on, with politicians posturing as it suits their cause. Meanwhile, we are able to enjoy the marbles, now at eye level.

The Gayer-Anderson Cat by Piedmont Fossil on Flickr.Via Flickr:
bronze with silver plaque and gold jewelry
Around 600 BC
Possibly from Saqqara

The Gayer-Anderson Cat by Piedmont Fossil on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
bronze with silver plaque and gold jewelry
Around 600 BC
Possibly from Saqqara

West Elevation of York Minster by Heaven`s Gate (John) on Flickr.Via Flickr:
York Minster is a cathedral in York, England, and is one of the largest of its kind in Northern Europe.
York Minster is the second largest Gothic cathedral of Northern Europe and clearly charts the development of English Gothic architecture from Early English through to the Perpendicular Period. The present building was begun in about 1230 and completed in 1472. It has a cruciform plan with an octagonal chapter house attached to the north transept, a central tower and two towers at the west front. The stone used for the building is magnesiam limestone, a creamy-white coloured rock that was quarried in nearby Tadcaster. The Minster is 173 yards (158 m) long and each of its three towers are 200 feet (61 m) high. The choir has an interior height of 102 feet (31 m).
The two west towers of the Minster hold bells, clock chimes and a concert carillon. The north-west tower contains Great Peter (216 cwt or 10.8 tons) and the six clock bells (the largest weighing just over 60 cwt or 3 tons). The south-west tower holds 14 bells (tenor 59 cwt or 3 tons) hung and rung for change ringing and 22 carillon bells (tenor 23 cwt or 1.2 tons) which are played from a baton keyboard in the ringing chamber. (all together 35 bells.)
Camera: Canon EOS 5D Merk II

West Elevation of York Minster by Heaven`s Gate (John) on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
York Minster is a cathedral in York, England, and is one of the largest of its kind in Northern Europe.
York Minster is the second largest Gothic cathedral of Northern Europe and clearly charts the development of English Gothic architecture from Early English through to the Perpendicular Period. The present building was begun in about 1230 and completed in 1472. It has a cruciform plan with an octagonal chapter house attached to the north transept, a central tower and two towers at the west front. The stone used for the building is magnesiam limestone, a creamy-white coloured rock that was quarried in nearby Tadcaster. The Minster is 173 yards (158 m) long and each of its three towers are 200 feet (61 m) high. The choir has an interior height of 102 feet (31 m).
The two west towers of the Minster hold bells, clock chimes and a concert carillon. The north-west tower contains Great Peter (216 cwt or 10.8 tons) and the six clock bells (the largest weighing just over 60 cwt or 3 tons). The south-west tower holds 14 bells (tenor 59 cwt or 3 tons) hung and rung for change ringing and 22 carillon bells (tenor 23 cwt or 1.2 tons) which are played from a baton keyboard in the ringing chamber. (all together 35 bells.)
Camera: Canon EOS 5D Merk II

Helmsley Castle by Dan65 on Flickr.

Helmsley Castle by Dan65 on Flickr.