MyFavHistoryPics
London Bloomsbury - British Museum - Sphinx of Taharqo - Kushite Egyptian pharaoh - head of granite sculpture c680BC - Temple ‘T’, Kawa, Sudan by edk7 on Flickr.
NC294 British Museum - Parthenon Sculptures, The Feast by HairyHippy on Flickr.Via Flickr:British Museum - Elgin Marbles, The Feast
The Parthenon Sculptures were created for the metopes high above the ground, to decorate the temple to Athena in Athens. The work was completed around 440 BC. The sculptures represented a procession, scenes from the then current mythology, and a feast.
Seeing how the Parthenon suffered damage over the centuries, Lord Elgin undertook the task of rescuing the remaining decorative carving at his own expense. In 1801 he removed as much as he could and by 1812 had removed around half of the original carvings. Some had been ground down and smashed for earlier building materials, and others suffered irreparable weather damage.
Elgin was almost bankrupt when the stones arrived in England, but the British government stepped in to purchase them from him, then presented them to the British Museum.
Even in those days there was controversy about removing the sculptures from Greece. The British not only said then but also still maintain that the works would suffer damage if returned to Athens. The Greeks say that their conservators are the best in the world. They also claim that the 19th century British restorers actually degraded the stones.
The debate will rumble on, with politicians posturing as it suits their cause. Meanwhile, we are able to enjoy the marbles, now at eye level.

NC294 British Museum - Parthenon Sculptures, The Feast by HairyHippy on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
British Museum - Elgin Marbles, The Feast

The Parthenon Sculptures were created for the metopes high above the ground, to decorate the temple to Athena in Athens. The work was completed around 440 BC. The sculptures represented a procession, scenes from the then current mythology, and a feast.

Seeing how the Parthenon suffered damage over the centuries, Lord Elgin undertook the task of rescuing the remaining decorative carving at his own expense. In 1801 he removed as much as he could and by 1812 had removed around half of the original carvings. Some had been ground down and smashed for earlier building materials, and others suffered irreparable weather damage.

Elgin was almost bankrupt when the stones arrived in England, but the British government stepped in to purchase them from him, then presented them to the British Museum.

Even in those days there was controversy about removing the sculptures from Greece. The British not only said then but also still maintain that the works would suffer damage if returned to Athens. The Greeks say that their conservators are the best in the world. They also claim that the 19th century British restorers actually degraded the stones.

The debate will rumble on, with politicians posturing as it suits their cause. Meanwhile, we are able to enjoy the marbles, now at eye level.

Stonehenge Sunrise: January 2014 by The Stonehenge Stone Circle Website. on Flickr.
The Gayer-Anderson Cat by Piedmont Fossil on Flickr.Via Flickr:
bronze with silver plaque and gold jewelry
Around 600 BC
Possibly from Saqqara

The Gayer-Anderson Cat by Piedmont Fossil on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
bronze with silver plaque and gold jewelry
Around 600 BC
Possibly from Saqqara

London - British Museum - Ancient Egyptian cat - Gayer-Anderson cat by Bardazzi Luca on Flickr.
Londres. British Museum. Cacera de lleons. Nínive, 645 aC. by Pilar Torres on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Londres. British Museum. Cacera de lleons. Nínive, 645 aC.

Londres. British Museum. Cacera de lleons. Nínive, 645 aC. by Pilar Torres on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Londres. British Museum. Cacera de lleons. Nínive, 645 aC.

_DSC6043 Ap Anx2 1300w Q90 V2 by edk7 on Flickr.
Greek Gold Libation Bowl, from Sicily c.600 BC by monopthalmos on Flickr.Via Flickr:
The shallow dished phiale or libation bowl is decorated with a procession of six walking bulls. The central recess may have once held a circular gem, and a crescent is pricked out. Gadrooned edge. 
The British Museum, London

Greek Gold Libation Bowl, from Sicily c.600 BC by monopthalmos on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
The shallow dished phiale or libation bowl is decorated with a procession of six walking bulls. The central recess may have once held a circular gem, and a crescent is pricked out. Gadrooned edge.

The British Museum, London

Italy, Apulia, Rhyton, drinking cup, Crocodile and African, c340 BC by monopthalmos on Flickr.Via Flickr:
The drinking cup with flaring rim and looped handle is moulded at the base with the scene of a young African boy held in the grip of a crocodile, one arm held by the crocodile’s looped tail, the other clamped in the beast’s jaws.
From Italy, Capua. Grouped with other vases in the ‘Negro Group’.
The British Museum, London

Italy, Apulia, Rhyton, drinking cup, Crocodile and African, c340 BC by monopthalmos on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
The drinking cup with flaring rim and looped handle is moulded at the base with the scene of a young African boy held in the grip of a crocodile, one arm held by the crocodile’s looped tail, the other clamped in the beast’s jaws.

From Italy, Capua. Grouped with other vases in the ‘Negro Group’.

The British Museum, London

Granite ram of Amun with King Taharqa by miltonmic on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Granite ram of Amun with King Taharqa
Twenty-fifth Dynasty, 690-664 BC
From Kawa in Nubia
The worship of Amun, imported into Nubia by the Egyptians, was carried on with great zeal by the royal family of the Twenty-fifth Dynasty. Taharqa built or enlarged several temples in honour of the god. This statue symbolises the god’s protection of the king.
EA 1779

Granite ram of Amun with King Taharqa by miltonmic on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Granite ram of Amun with King Taharqa
Twenty-fifth Dynasty, 690-664 BC
From Kawa in Nubia

The worship of Amun, imported into Nubia by the Egyptians, was carried on with great zeal by the royal family of the Twenty-fifth Dynasty. Taharqa built or enlarged several temples in honour of the god. This statue symbolises the god’s protection of the king.

EA 1779