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The Mayan Pyramid by 75Central Photography on Flickr.
Pirámide del Adivino by guillenperez on Flickr.Via Flickr: 
View of the Pyramid of the Magician, the most impressive structure in Uxmal and unique elliptic in the Mayan world, from the house of turtles.

Pirámide del Adivino by guillenperez on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
View of the Pyramid of the Magician, the most impressive structure in Uxmal and unique elliptic in the Mayan world, from the house of turtles.

Tulum by Matt Champlin on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Tropical Mayan ruins!

Tulum by Matt Champlin on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Tropical Mayan ruins!

IMAG0097 by Jim R W on Flickr.

IMAG0097 by Jim R W on Flickr.

Temple of the Warriors, Chichen Itza by Aidan McRae Thomson on Flickr.
Pyramid of the Magician, Uxmal by Aidan McRae Thomson on Flickr.Via Flickr:
The Mayan city of Uxmal is one of the most important in Mexico, its major buildings surviving in unusually good condition and distinctively designed, exhibiting the ‘Puuc’ style (found especially in this area of the Yucatan Penninsula) which employs large areas of semi-abstract geometric surface decoration on the facades of temples and palaces. 
This decoration reaches its zenith at Uxmal, where great swathes of patterned relief adorn the major structures along with the distinctive masks of the hook-nosed rain god Chac marking the corners. The cult of Chac was very important here, with rain collected in cisterns providing the principal source of water.
The city is believed to have been founded in the mid 7th century AD but abandoned before the Spanish conquest.
The most significant buildings here are the ‘Pyramid of the Magician’, the ‘Nunnery Quadrangle’, the ‘Great Pyramid’ and the ‘Palace of the Governor’, all of which represent the highest achievements and most ornate forms of the ancient Mayan Puuc style.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uxmal

Pyramid of the Magician, Uxmal by Aidan McRae Thomson on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
The Mayan city of Uxmal is one of the most important in Mexico, its major buildings surviving in unusually good condition and distinctively designed, exhibiting the ‘Puuc’ style (found especially in this area of the Yucatan Penninsula) which employs large areas of semi-abstract geometric surface decoration on the facades of temples and palaces.

This decoration reaches its zenith at Uxmal, where great swathes of patterned relief adorn the major structures along with the distinctive masks of the hook-nosed rain god Chac marking the corners. The cult of Chac was very important here, with rain collected in cisterns providing the principal source of water.

The city is believed to have been founded in the mid 7th century AD but abandoned before the Spanish conquest.

The most significant buildings here are the ‘Pyramid of the Magician’, the ‘Nunnery Quadrangle’, the ‘Great Pyramid’ and the ‘Palace of the Governor’, all of which represent the highest achievements and most ornate forms of the ancient Mayan Puuc style.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uxmal

Pyramid of the Magician, Uxmal by Aidan McRae Thomson on Flickr.Via Flickr:
The Mayan city of Uxmal is one of the most important in Mexico, its major buildings surviving in unusually good condition and distinctively designed, exhibiting the ‘Puuc’ style (found especially in this area of the Yucatan Penninsula) which employs large areas of semi-abstract geometric surface decoration on the facades of temples and palaces. 
This decoration reaches its zenith at Uxmal, where great swathes of patterned relief adorn the major structures along with the distinctive masks of the hook-nosed rain god Chac marking the corners. The cult of Chac was very important here, with rain collected in cisterns providing the principal source of water.
The city is believed to have been founded in the mid 7th century AD but abandoned before the Spanish conquest.
The most significant buildings here are the ‘Pyramid of the Magician’, the ‘Nunnery Quadrangle’, the ‘Great Pyramid’ and the ‘Palace of the Governor’, all of which represent the highest achievements and most ornate forms of the ancient Mayan Puuc style.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uxmal

Pyramid of the Magician, Uxmal by Aidan McRae Thomson on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
The Mayan city of Uxmal is one of the most important in Mexico, its major buildings surviving in unusually good condition and distinctively designed, exhibiting the ‘Puuc’ style (found especially in this area of the Yucatan Penninsula) which employs large areas of semi-abstract geometric surface decoration on the facades of temples and palaces.

This decoration reaches its zenith at Uxmal, where great swathes of patterned relief adorn the major structures along with the distinctive masks of the hook-nosed rain god Chac marking the corners. The cult of Chac was very important here, with rain collected in cisterns providing the principal source of water.

The city is believed to have been founded in the mid 7th century AD but abandoned before the Spanish conquest.

The most significant buildings here are the ‘Pyramid of the Magician’, the ‘Nunnery Quadrangle’, the ‘Great Pyramid’ and the ‘Palace of the Governor’, all of which represent the highest achievements and most ornate forms of the ancient Mayan Puuc style.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uxmal

Pyramid, Monte Alban by Aidan McRae Thomson on Flickr.Via Flickr:
The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside.
The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it’s decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten.
The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the ‘Dancers’ due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!).
Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n

Pyramid, Monte Alban by Aidan McRae Thomson on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
The ancient site of Monte Alban stands in a commanding position atop a low mountainous range overlooking the city of Oaxaca, a spectacular vantage point with superb views across the surrounding countryside.

The ruins are amongst the earliest in Mexico dating back to c500BC and the product of Zapotec culture. It was inhabitated up to it’s decline as a city between c500-750AD, after which it was mostly abandoned and forgotten.

The site is an a huge scale with vast ceremonial courtyards and several pyramid-like structures and temple platforms, many with grand staircases giving access to higher levels. There is also a ball court and a sequence of relief sculptures, known as the ‘Dancers’ due to their strange contortions (but considered more likely to be sacrificial victims or prisoners!).

Several tombs have been found at the site, and some fine pre-Columbian treasures were found, now on display in the archaeological museum in Oaxaca.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Alb%C3%A1n

Mexico Teotihuacan temple pyramid by WorldFlickr on Flickr.
Mexico-3070 - Comalcalco - the only Mayan Brick Pyramid by archer10 (Dennis) on Flickr.Via Flickr:
The literal English translation of “Comalcalco” is “In the house of the comals”. A “comal” is a tortilla-pan. Although this is a name given by Aztecs recently the Maya name has been deciphered and it is “JOY CHAN” (knotted ceiling).
It is the western most known Maya settlement.
The Mayan ruins at Comalcalco are a mystery to archaeologists and other researchers studying the unique architectural style of the ancient city. Other Mesoamerican sites of the Maya, were built using hand carved limestone blocks - not bricks. This is the only Mayan pyramid built from fired bricks.
When an oyster-base mortar used to bind the bricks was removed, it revealed various odd markings on the back of the bricks, including what is believed to be the brick maker’s fingerprints.

Mexico-3070 - Comalcalco - the only Mayan Brick Pyramid by archer10 (Dennis) on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
The literal English translation of “Comalcalco” is “In the house of the comals”. A “comal” is a tortilla-pan. Although this is a name given by Aztecs recently the Maya name has been deciphered and it is “JOY CHAN” (knotted ceiling).

It is the western most known Maya settlement.

The Mayan ruins at Comalcalco are a mystery to archaeologists and other researchers studying the unique architectural style of the ancient city. Other Mesoamerican sites of the Maya, were built using hand carved limestone blocks - not bricks. This is the only Mayan pyramid built from fired bricks.

When an oyster-base mortar used to bind the bricks was removed, it revealed various odd markings on the back of the bricks, including what is believed to be the brick maker’s fingerprints.