MyFavHistoryPics
Khufu’s Tomb by Matt Champlin on Flickr.Via Flickr:
The Great Pyramid at Giza surrounded by ruins of the larger Giza funerary complex.

Khufu’s Tomb by Matt Champlin on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
The Great Pyramid at Giza surrounded by ruins of the larger Giza funerary complex.

Saqqare Djoser´s Step Pyramid by jagudo on Flickr.
Mayan Stelae at Caracol by Matt Champlin on Flickr.
Entrance to the tomb of Sennedjem by sdhaddow on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Deir el-Medina, Theban Necropolis
Sennedjem was an artisan who lived and worked in Deir el-Medina, a village inhabited by the workers responsible for the construction and decoration of the royal tombs in the Valley of the Kings. Sennedjem lived during the reigns of Seti I and Ramesses II (New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty). He was buried with his wife (Iy-neferti) and family in a tomb in the village necropolis. The tomb was discovered on January 31, 1886.

Entrance to the tomb of Sennedjem by sdhaddow on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Deir el-Medina, Theban Necropolis

Sennedjem was an artisan who lived and worked in Deir el-Medina, a village inhabited by the workers responsible for the construction and decoration of the royal tombs in the Valley of the Kings. Sennedjem lived during the reigns of Seti I and Ramesses II (New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty). He was buried with his wife (Iy-neferti) and family in a tomb in the village necropolis. The tomb was discovered on January 31, 1886.

The Giza Sphinx at Sunset by Matt Champlin on Flickr.
IMG_1374 by Chris Irie on Flickr.Via Flickr:
The pyramid at Meidum.

IMG_1374 by Chris Irie on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
The pyramid at Meidum.

Mayan Pyramids by Matt Champlin on Flickr.
IMG_1363 by Chris Irie on Flickr.Via Flickr:
The pyramid at Meidum and its temple.

IMG_1363 by Chris Irie on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
The pyramid at Meidum and its temple.

Pyramid of the Magician, Uxmal by Aidan McRae Thomson on Flickr.Via Flickr:
The Mayan city of Uxmal is one of the most important in Mexico, its major buildings surviving in unusually good condition and distinctively designed, exhibiting the ‘Puuc’ style (found especially in this area of the Yucatan Penninsula) which employs large areas of semi-abstract geometric surface decoration on the facades of temples and palaces. 
This decoration reaches its zenith at Uxmal, where great swathes of patterned relief adorn the major structures along with the distinctive masks of the hook-nosed rain god Chac marking the corners. The cult of Chac was very important here, with rain collected in cisterns providing the principal source of water.
The city is believed to have been founded in the mid 7th century AD but abandoned before the Spanish conquest.
The most significant buildings here are the ‘Pyramid of the Magician’, the ‘Nunnery Quadrangle’, the ‘Great Pyramid’ and the ‘Palace of the Governor’, all of which represent the highest achievements and most ornate forms of the ancient Mayan Puuc style.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uxmal

Pyramid of the Magician, Uxmal by Aidan McRae Thomson on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
The Mayan city of Uxmal is one of the most important in Mexico, its major buildings surviving in unusually good condition and distinctively designed, exhibiting the ‘Puuc’ style (found especially in this area of the Yucatan Penninsula) which employs large areas of semi-abstract geometric surface decoration on the facades of temples and palaces.

This decoration reaches its zenith at Uxmal, where great swathes of patterned relief adorn the major structures along with the distinctive masks of the hook-nosed rain god Chac marking the corners. The cult of Chac was very important here, with rain collected in cisterns providing the principal source of water.

The city is believed to have been founded in the mid 7th century AD but abandoned before the Spanish conquest.

The most significant buildings here are the ‘Pyramid of the Magician’, the ‘Nunnery Quadrangle’, the ‘Great Pyramid’ and the ‘Palace of the Governor’, all of which represent the highest achievements and most ornate forms of the ancient Mayan Puuc style.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uxmal

Pyramids by dimakk on Flickr.

Pyramids by dimakk on Flickr.